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EDMONTON ICE ELITE SENIOR

THE NEWS

WOW!! That's about the only word I can think of to describe this season! The Edmonton Ice Elite put every ounce of energy into every practice, exibition, hockey game and competition this year and they proved to be successful. The team remained the premier team in the west winning every competition they attended and ended up with a sixth place finish at Nationals! The girls are extremely excited about this accomplishment and can't wait to start next year's programs. As most of you know a top six placement lands a team on Team Canada for the next year where you can compete internationally. With this spot on Team Canada the team knows that they will have to work twice as hard as last year. But I am confident that every thing will go smoothly. Congratulations girls on a wonderful performance all year!!

On behalf of the Edmonton Ice Elite, I would like to thank everyone who was supporting the team throught the year and especially all the wonderful spectators and competitors at Nationals. Your support is what has brought us to the level that we are at. Thank you very much, we appreciate everything!! Thanks again!! :)

As a reminder, we are not officially setting the team until the end of the summer (but as it stands we won't have to many spaces open) so if you wish to try-out for our team or if you have any questions feel free to e-mail me at gazpachobob@homtail.com

Club History

The Edmonton Precision Skating Club, home of the Edmonton Ice Elite, has a long and distinguished history of synchronized skating in Canada. In 1978 the club formed the first synchronized skating team in Alberta, Canada and one of the first in western Canada. The club is recognized throughout Canada for its excellence and outstanding achievements in synchronized skating.

The first Canadian Synchronized Skating Championships were held in 1983 in London, Ontario Canada. The Edmonton Junior Precision team captured the title of Canadian Junior Champions.

In 1984 the Edmonton Senior Precision team earned a Bronze medal at the National Championships.

In 1986 the Edmonton Senior Precision team skated a Gold medal performance and became the only western team to win a Canadian Senior Championships.

The Edmonton Ice Elite was named to Canada's National Synchronized Skating Team as a result of a top six placement at the Canadian Synchronized Championships in Hamilton, Ontario in April 1996. They represented Canada in two International Synchronized Skating Competitions in February 1997, placing fifth in Milan, Italy and third in Rouen, France. In both of those competitions they competed against 17 other International synchronized skating teams.

The Edmonton Ice Elite have reamined western Canada's top team, and one of the top ten Synchronized teams in Canada, competing on a local, provincial, national and international level.

We look forward to another successful year in Synchronized Skating and welcome all new skaters to our club.


My   Own   Little   Message

WHAT IS SYNCHRONIZED SKATING?????

Synchronized skating involves a team of 12 to 20 (16 to 20 if it is a senior team) skaters skating various manoeuvers and formations to a select piece of music that the team has chosen. As the definition implies, synchronized skating refers to the importance of unison, accuracy of formations, and synchronization of the team. There are five levels of synchronized skating in Canada, Juvenile, Novice, Junior, Senior, and Adult. The criteria for being on each team is as follows:

Juvenile Team: Must not have reached the age of 12 by July 1 preceeding the competition year. (Althouhg Juvenile teams do not compete at the same nationals as the Senior and Junior teams they will now have their first National competition in the 1998-99 season)

Novice Team: Must not have reached the age 15 by July 1 preceeding the competition year.

Junior Team: Must have reached the age 12 but must be under the age of 19 by July 1 preceeding the competition year. (Junior teams competiting in ISU competitions must have all skaters 14 years and under 19 by July 1 of the preceeding year)

Senior Team: Must have reached the age of 14 by July 1 preceeding the competition year.

Adult Team: Must be 21 or older as of July 1 preceeding the competition year. 75% of the team must be 25 years old or older.

NEW CHANGES!!!!!!

Well what a year for Precision Skating! Excuse me, I mean Synchronized Skating! The ISU has just announced that the name of Precision Skating is changing. Why, you ask? Well, the ISU believes that in order to get Precision more recognized around the world the name had to be changed to something everyone can relate to. So Synchronized Skating is now the official name of the sport. Along with our name being changed there have been various other changes that should be noted. In Canada and ISU competitions, the number of skaters on a senior synchro team has been changed from 24 with 4 alternates to 20 with 4 alternates. This will bring an enormous change to our sport because having four less skaters on the ice gives for more difficult routines, faster skating, straighter lines etc... Even now with our summer practices we have already began to see an improvement in our skating. One other change that has to be noted is the change to the elements in the Senior Short program. They are as follows:

APPENDIX C TECHNICAL REVISIONS TO SYNCHRONIZED SKATING SHORT PROGRAMS FOR SENIOR TEAMS

Senior Synchronized Skating Short Program

The Senior Short Program shall consist of the following required elements: a) CIRCLE (i) any type or combination of a circle(s) to a maximum of 2 circles at any time (ii) at least 2 different holds (iii) at least 2 different step sequences

b) LINE (i) any type or combination of single or double straight line(s) that travels the full length of the ice surface and moves in either a horizontal and/or longitudinal direction (ii) at least 2 different holds (iii) at least 2 different step sequences

c) BLOCK (i) closed block (ii) maximum of 5 lines, minimum of 4 lines (iii) at least 3 different axes (iv) at least 2 different configurations (v) at least 2 different holds (vi) at least 2 different step sequences

d) WHEEL (i) 1 wheel at any time (ii) 3 different geometrical shapes

e) INTERSECTION (i) any type of manoeuvre that incorporates movement of one part of the team through another part of the team (ii) 3 intersections

Remarks Senior:

CIRCLE

There may be different numbers of skaters in each of the circles. The circle(s) may revolve clockwise or counter-clockwise or a combination of both directions. The circles must not be linked or intersecting. Skaters must execute the same step sequences in all circles excluding free skating moves and when changing direction of circles. The step sequences may be executed on opposite feet and the skaters may be in a forward or backward direction. Very small hops of not more than one-half revolution are permitted. Different heights and different free leg extensions may be used. Skaters must use the same hold and change the hold at the same time excluding free skating moves and when changing direction of circle(s). The circles may travel together and/or separately and may revolve and/or travel in opposite directions. Free skating moves (such as lunges, spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles) are permitted. Separations are permitted.

LINE

The maximum number of lines is 2. The lines may be but do not have to be parallel. The lines may have different numbers of skaters. Line(s) must start and end extended across the width of the ice surface in close proximity to the end red hockey lines (or short barrier). As long as parallel lines are in close proximity, one of the lines may be slightly forward of the red hockey line at the start and end of the manoeuvre. Lines may move horizontally and/or vertically and slight retrogression (for the purpose of changing direction) is permitted. Some minor deviation in the straight line(s) is permitted when changing from horizontal to vertical or reverse. Pivot lines may be used but they must not pivot more than 90 degrees. Skaters must execute the same step sequences in all lines excluding free skating moves and when changing direction of the lines. The step sequences may be executed on opposite feet and the skaters may be in a forward or backward direction. Skaters must use the same hold and change the hold at the same time excluding free skating moves and when changing direction of the lines. Lines may be joined or separate and may pass by each other when going from either a single to parallel lines or parallel to a single line. Very small hops of not more than one-half revolution are permitted. Free skating moves (such as lunges, spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles) are permitted. Separations are permitted.

BLOCK

The number of skaters in each line must be as close to equal as possible. The block must travel at least the full length of the ice surface. Very small hops of not more than one-half revolution are permitted. Free skating moves (such as lunges, Ina Bauers, spread eagles) are permitted. Spirals are not permitted. Separations are permitted.

WHEEL

The wheel may revolve either clockwise or counter-clockwise or a combination of both directions. There are no required holds or step sequences, and any combination or variety thereof may be used. Very small hops of not more than one-half revolution are permitted. Free skating moves (such as lunges, spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles) are permitted. Separations are permitted.

INTERSECTION

The intersection(s) may occur simultaneously or separately as long as every skater is involved in the intersection. Skaters may execute different movements at any time during the intersecting manouevre but highlighting of a skater(s) is not permitted. Intersecting manoeuvres must be continuous. There are no required holds or step sequences and any combination or variety thereof may be used. Very small hops of not more than one-half revolution are permitted. Free skating moves (such as lunges, spirals, Ina Bauers, spread eagles) are permitted, however back spirals are not permitted.

SYNCHRONIZED SKATING HISTORY

The first synchro team in North America was the Hockettes founded in 1956 by Dr. Porter. The Hockettes are still skating as a team today at the Ann Arbor Figure Skating Club. The first International competition called the Tri-States took place in Ann Arbor in 1976. Ever since then precision has gotten more popular due to the fact that it gives skaters of all ages and skills the opportunity to participate. Synchronized skating is the only team competition in figure skating. The World Challenge Cup is the test event for a World Championships. The first official World Championships will be held next year (2000) and there is hope that someday synchronized skating will be an event in the Winter Olympics. Hopefully in Salt Lake City, 2002.

Hopefully everyone has a safe and happy summer and I hope that everyone's season was as successful as our's was!! Good luck next year everyone!!!

LAST UPDATED MARCH 29, 1999

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My Awesome Links

Awesome Links Page
A bunch of awesome skating links that I think everyone should visit!!
International Skating Union
A place where you can find out what new is happening and you also can find almost all the skating results
Precision Skating Message Board
If you want to know what is what then this message board is great it is always open to new questions and the topics discussed are great
Canadian Figure Skating Association
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